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  • Latest Posts

    • Anyone still interested to have meet ups in / around Amsterdam? 
    • Day 308 of 'What would someone who loves themselves do?' I paid off a credit card and damn it feels good.  In the next few days I'll be putting $10,000 right back on it to test out a health product that could potentially end this Chronic Fatigue and be a source of income for other people wanting to start their own business. It's all part of the master plan to move out of Alaska. 
    • Don't put Napolean on too high a pedestal.  He was still a human with all the toppings, good and bad.  He took on Russia and was not prepared. That's on him. His fault or misjudgement. Perhaps the scene was an artistic reminder of that.  Such things have the same potential to happen to all commander. Alexander the Great ring a bell. Great tactician. Hit a brick wall in India. Maybe they were both struck with a little too much greed, arrogance or pride? (LOL, those are two of seven original sins of man mentioned in Captain Marvel comics.) You mention colonials. I heard that Napolean admired Washington, who from an earlier time was also admired by his soldiers. Talk about an uneven fight. Farmers and shopkeepers against seasoned soldiers and mercenaries. Time, place, location, planning and sometimes the occasional luck (fog rolling in just when you need it)  may very well determine success, draw or failure, no matter how brilliant or foolish a tactician. I learn some new insights every time I reflect on history. The context of the time someone lived or we reflect on is always nuanced. Important. Aren't archaeologist always scratching their heads asking the question why did group X do Y. Later getting some answers after studying the flow of events at the time and the player in the region. Like Romans, salting of the earth or having at times a scorched earth policy. If you knew a little history of the Germanic tribes, you'd understand it was a  brilliant idea. Keep large invading parties hungry or dead to protect weakly defended areas. Brilliant. Create a dead zone buffer. Sorta like the Great Wall of China to slow down the barbarians. Its a different world today.  Onto training and more importantly as a solid foundation, discipline and trust. Discipline is an army's best friend. Why did armies at that time have the practice of a controlled retreat rather than chaotic run for your lives when pressed into a difficult situation. Perhaps you would  lose fewer foot soldiers to cavalry charges from the rear. I image it is a little harder to break a formation of men bunched together with cavalry breathing down your neck versus a cavalry able to maneuver freely at full speed; chopping away at individuals running away as they go. At least it would slow the cavalry down just a little.
    • Ok. So, you're not going to answer the question?    
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